Career and Technical Ed

Faculty

Parker Bane M.S. University of Illinois pbane@pontiac90.org
Scott Rowan Cooking and Hospitality Institute of Chicago srowan@pontiac90.org
Corey Christianson M.A. Olivet Nazarene University cchristianson@pontiac90.org
Jesse Faber M.S. University of Illinois jfaber@pontiac90.org
Doug Masching B.S. Illinois State University dmasching@pontiac90.org
Stephanie Nelson M.S. University of St. Francis snelson@pontiac90.org
Chuck Prong M.S. University of St. Francis cprong@pontiac90.org
Amy Richardson M.A. Olivet Nazarene University arichardson@pontiac90.org
Ryan Woith B.S. Illinois State University rwoith@pontiac90.org

Course Descriptions

INTRO TO AGRICULTURE (002, 003)
Class Level: 09 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: None
This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in animal science, plant science, soil science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, agricultural mechanics, agricultural biotechnology, food science technology, environmental science and aquacultural science and technology will be presented. The development of leadership, employability and computer skills will also be taught. Because FFA and Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs are integral components of this course, students are encouraged to maintain an SAEP and to participate in activities of the organization.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE (004, 005)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Introduction to Agriculture
This orientation course builds on basic skills and knowledge gained in the Introduction to the Agricultural Industry course. Major units of instruction include advanced plant science, soil science, animal science, and agricultural mechanics. Applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (006, 007)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Biology
Animals (1st semester) This course is designed to reinforce and extend students’ understanding of science by associating scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture.  Students will examine major phases of animal agriculture and specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions in the animal industry.  Topics of study are in the areas of growth and development of animals – embryology, ethology, nutrition, immunity systems, and processing animal products – preservation, fermentation, and pasteurization.  The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.Plants (2nd semester) This course is designed to reinforce and extend students’ understanding of science by associating basic scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture.  Students will examine major phases of plant growth and management in agriculture and the specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions  Topics of study are in the areas of initiating plant growth – germination, plant sensory mechanisms, enzyme action, absorption, and managing plant growth – photosynthesis, respiration, translocation, metabolism, and growth regulation.  The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.
LANDSCAPING AND TURF MANAGEMENT (008, 009)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Intro to Agriculture
This advanced course focuses on the landscape, nursery, and turf segments of the horticulture industry. Units of student include: identifying landscape plants, designing landscape plans, landscape construction techniques, and installing landscape plants. Also included are nursery production, turf grass production, small engine repair, and maintenance of existing landscapes. Agribusiness units will cover calculating prices for work, managing a horticulture business, advertising, and sales. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.
NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION (010, 011)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: None
This course develops management and conservation skills in understanding the connection between agriculture and natural resources.  Students will gain knowledge and develop skills in understanding natural resources and its importance; fish, wildlife, and forestry management and conservation; and exploring outdoor recreational enterprises.  Hunting and fishing as a sport, growing and managing tree forests, and outdoor safety education will be featured.  Career exploration will be discussed including: park ranger, game warden, campground manager, forester, conservation officer, wildlife manager, and related occupations.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.
AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (012, 013)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Intro to Agriculture
This course will provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to manage personal finances and develop into a successful entrepreneur and/or business person.  Instructional units include:  business ownership types, starting an agribusiness, managing and operating an agribusiness, financing an agribusiness, managing personal finances, record keeping and financial management of an agribusiness, local, state, and federal taxes, agricultural law, and developing employability skills.  Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (014, 015)
Class Level: 09, 10 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Intro to Agriculture or Instructor’s Consent
This course examines the relationship of agriculture and the environment.  The impact of plant and animal production practices on the environment and the adoption of practices leading to improved air, land, and water quality are investigated.  Areas of emphasis include:  types of ecosystems, management of waste, chemical use, soil conservation, land uses and regulations, and water and air quality.  Encouraging students to be conscious and concerned about the environment and recognizing the need to conserve the environment and its resources will be a theme throughout.  Career of environmental technicians, soil and water conservationists, monitoring field technicians, land surveyor, and related occupations will be examined.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.
SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE I (016, 017)
Class Level: 09, 10 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Intro to Agriculture or Instructor’s Consent
This experience program is for students in the 9th and 10th grades. Students receiving career and technical credit in this area must be enrolled in an approved agricultural program sequence. Individual students will have a minimum of one approved project or acceptable plans for a project. Supervised study, project record book-work, training plans and agreements, report writing, and instructor project visitation and supervision are essentials of the supervised agricultural experience.
SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE II (018, 019)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: SAE I or BSAA
This experience program is for 11th and 12th grade agricultural students. The opportunities and responsibilities are similar to those discussed under Supervised Agricultural Experience I with the exception that the experiences are conducted at a more advanced level of skill training. The project should be expanded as the student progresses through the agricultural program.
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (050)
Class Level: 09 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
Computer and Information Technology courses teach students to operate and use computer and information technology, emphasizing their roles tools to communicate more effectively, conduct research more efficiently, and increase productivity.  Course content includes the legal and ethical issues involved with computer technology and use.
ACCOUNTING I (070, 071)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: None
This course provides the student with the necessary skills and techniques to perform double-entry accounting tasks commonly found in a sole proprietorship and partnership business.  Directed practice through problems and a manual and automated simulation allows the student to maintain a set of books covering the entire accounting cycle from analyzing, journalizing, posting to general and subsidiary ledgers, adjusting and closing entries at the end of a fiscal period, and preparing financial statements.
ACCOUNTING II (075)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Accounting I
Accounting II develops and enhances the accounting knowledge and skills learned in Accounting I.  This course details the career opportunities in accounting and provides students with the knowledge for entry-level accounting positions and a foundation for further accounting study.  Additional study of corporate accounting and automated accounting for Windows is implemented to take the student through sole-proprietorship, partnership, and corporate accounting procedures.
CONSUMER EDUCATION (080)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
This course provides students with a better understanding of being a productive and ethical member of society.  Students will be introduced and given applications on the following topics:  economics in our world today, consumer protection, advertising and its influences on the consumer, comparative shopping, using checking and savings accounts, borrowing and investing money, using charge accounts and installment contracts, buying home, auto and life insurance, providing housing, law and the consumer, and preparing personal income tax forms.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (092)
Class Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Keyboarding or Comptr/Kybrd Fund
This is an introductory course utilizing computers and their capabilities, terminology, and functions.  Students will be introduced to types of information processing hardware, software, and business applications.  Word processing and spreadsheets will be created and edited in this course.
ADVANCED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (095)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Computer Applications
Advanced Computer Applications is designed as a follow-up course to Computer Applications.  This course builds on the students’ knowledge of word processing and spreadsheets.  Students will be introduced to creating a database.  Students will develop projects that integrate software applications.
WEB PAGE AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA DEVELOPMENT I (097)
Class Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Computer Applications
Web Page and Interactive Media Development I is a skill-level course designed to prepare students to plan, design, create and maintain web pages and sites.  Students will learn the fundamentals of web page design using HTML, HTML editors, and graphic editors as well as programming tools such as JavaScript.  Students will work in a project-based environment to create a working website.  Students will learn to create pages, and hyperlinks, make tables and frames, create forms, integrate images, and set styles.  Students will use image-editing programs to manipulate scanned images, computer graphics, and original artwork.  Instruction will include creating graphical headers, interactive menus and buttons, and visually appealing backgrounds.  Students will use hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and video clips.
WEB PAGE AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA DEVELOPMENT II (098)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Web Design I
Web Page and Interactive Media Development II is a skill-level course for students who have completed Web Page and Interactive Media Development I.  Instruction will include using multimedia authoring applications and programming tools such as JavaScript to create a web site that combines text, hyperlinks, images, video, and sound.  Instruction will include using hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and video clips as well as create animated text, graphics, and images.  Other topics will include using table to align images with text, creating newspaper-style columns, and inserting side menus and call-outs.  Students will learn how to use templates, cascading style sheets and interactive elements to enhance web pages.  Students will learn to create dynamic forms that include multiple-choice questions, comment boxes, and buttons.  Students will learn how to connect to a database and retrieve and write data.  Students are encouraged to develop a portfolio project that demonstrates their expertise in areas such as multimedia authoring, web development, audio and video editing, and advanced JavaScript applications to create interactive web pages.
MARKETING (099)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
This course explores the basic principles of marketing such as the creation of concepts, strategies, and the development of marketing plans.  Students learn about the components of the marketing mix, target marketing, sponsorship, event marketing, promotions, proposals, and execution of planning.  This course emphasizes strong decision making, critical thinking, and collaborative skills to complete group marketing projects throughout the semester.  Marketing introduces students to this exciting field, which includes advertising, consumer research, product development, packaging, and selling.  Students will be challenged to create new marketing ideas as they analyze current marketing trends.  Students will also explore the legal aspects of these industries.  Real life projects allow students to demonstrate their understanding of these areas.  This course will examine the impact of marketing in our everyday lives, as well as teach many critical business concepts to ready students for a career in the area of marketing.
FAMILY AND CAREER RELATIONSHIPS (200)
Class Level: 09 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to focus on the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors needed to participate in positive, caring, and respectful relationships in the family, community, and workplace.  This project-based course uses communication, leadership and management methods to develop knowledge and behaviors necessary for individuals to become independent, contributing, and responsible participants in family, community, and career settings.  Emphasis is placed on the development of techniques and strategies to assist individuals in responding to situations presented in family relationships and the workplace.  The course content includes:  managing responsibilities, satisfactions and stresses of work and family life; analyzing personal standards, needs, aptitudes and goals; roles and responsibilities of living independently and as a family member; demonstrating goal-setting and decision-making skills; identifying and utilizing community resources; and developing effective relationships to promote communication with others.  The course provides students content to identify resources that will assist them in managing life situations.
FOODS I (205)
Class Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Living Skills recommended
This course includes classroom and laboratory experiences needed to develop a knowledge and understanding of culinary principles and nutrition for people of all ages.  Course content encompass:  food service and preparation management using the decision-making process; meeting basic needs by applying nutrition concepts; meeting health, safety, and sanitation requirements; maximizing resources when planning/preparing/preserving/serving food; applying hospitality skills; analyzing nutritional needs in relation to change; and careers in nutrition and culinary arts, including entrepreneurship investigation.
FOODS II (206)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Food I
This course continues to broaden and develop the student’s knowledge and understanding of culinary principles and nutrition for people of all ages.  Course content encompass:  food service and preparation management using the decision-making process; meeting basic needs by applying nutrition concepts; meeting health, safety, and sanitation requirements; maximizing resources when planning/preparing/preserving/serving food; applying hospitality skills; analyzing nutritional needs in relation to change; and careers in nutrition and culinary arts, including entrepreneurship investigation.
TEXTILES AND DESIGN I (201)
Class Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Living Skills is recommended
This course is designed to provide basic knowledge and understanding of the design, development, and production of textile products.  Through hands-on and project based learning experiences students will discover fiber characteristics, fabric construction methods, elements of science and design in textiles and apparel, and basic construction skills used in interior furnishings and apparel industries.  This course emphasizes awareness and investigation of careers and industry trends in textiles
TEXTILES AND DESIGN II(202)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Clothing and Design I
This course continues to provide basic knowledge and understanding of the design, development, and production of textile products.  Through hands-on and project based learning experiences students will discover fiber characteristics, fabric construction methods, elements of science and design in textiles and apparel, and basic construction skills used in interior furnishings and apparel industries.  This course emphasizes awareness and investigation of careers and industry trends in textiles.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT (220)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
Child Development and Parenting addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children. The focus is on research-based nurturing and parenting practices and skills, including brain development research, that support positive development of children.  Students will explore opportunities in human services and education-related careers and develop a career portfolio.
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING (CONSUMER MANAGEMENT) (223)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
This course focuses on the identification and management of personal and family resources to meet the needs, values, and wants of individuals and families throughout the life cycle.  The course utilizes a variety of project-based experiences and service learning opportunities to gain knowledge and expertise in understanding and applying management skills, with consideration to diverse social, economic, technological, environmental, and cultural characteristics of individuals and families.  Topics include:  consumer rights and responsibilities in the marketplace; financial responsibility and decision making; planning and money management; credit and debt; risk management and insurance; saving and investment; homeownership; state and federal taxes; electronic banking; and current issues in the economy.
PARENTING (225)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
This course helps students understand the responsibilities, satisfactions and stresses of parenthood.  Course content includes the following;  managing and organizing parenting by applying decision-making and goal-setting skills; applying the basic principles of the parenting process; practicing health and safety standards as related to parenting; providing experiences which encourage parents and children to maximize resources; encouraging human relations skills in children/adolescents; community resource agencies and services; and evaluating impact on parenting of family and career changes.
INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY (235)
Class Level: 09, 10, 11 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
The course should expose students to the variety of opportunities available within the health care industry (e.g., such as nursing, therapy, vision and dental care, administrative services, and lab technology) which should include classroom and community-based activities. The main purpose of this course is to assist students in further development of their self-concept and in matching personal abilities and interest to a tentative career choice. The suggested course content should provide in-depth information into health occupations careers and trends, the occupational and educational opportunities and the educational, physical, emotional and attitudinal requirements.
COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (256)
Class Level: 09 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
Communication Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of the technologies used to communicate in our modern society.  Students gain experience in the areas of design and drafting, radio and television broadcasting, computers in communication, photography, graphic arts, and telecommunications.
PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY (258)
Class Level: 09 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
Production Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of manufacturing and construction technology.  Through a variety of learning activities, students are exposed to many career opportunities in the production field.  Experiences in manufacturing include product design, materials and processes, tools and equipment including computers, safety procedures, corporate structure, management, research and development, production planning, mass production, marketing and servicing.  In construction, students are exposed to site preparation, foundations, building structures, installing utilities, and finishing and servicing structures.
TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY (259)
Class Level: 09 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
Transportation Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of the various transportation customs that make up our mobile society.  Through laboratory activities, students are exposed to the technologies of and career opportunities involved in material handling, atmospheric and space transportation, marine transportation, terrestrial transportation, and computer uses in transportation technology.
METALS (265)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: None
This is a beginning course which covers the fundamentals of basic metalworking. Fundamentals will be stressed and skill development will be emphasized in the following areas: safety, layout, drilling, bending, cutting, filing, grinding, riveting, soldering, use of hand tools and measuring devices. Oxyfuel and SMAW welding are also covered. Completion of Introduction to Technology-Production is recommended.
DRAFTING I (275)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Intro to Tech Communications recommended
Drafting—General courses, usually offered as a sequence of courses, introduce students to the technical craft of drawing illustrations to represent and/or analyze design specifications and then refine the skills necessary for this craft.  Drafting—General courses use exercises from a variety of applications to provide students with the knowledge and experience to develop the ability to perform freehand sketching, lettering, geometric construction, and multi-view projections and to produce various types of drawings (working, detail, assembly, schematic, perspective, and so on).  Computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems (if available) are typically introduced and used to fulfill course objectives.
DRAFTING II (276)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Drafting I
Drafting II is a continuation of the technical craft of drawing illustrations to represent and/or analyze design specifications and then refine the skills necessary for this craft.  Drafting—General courses use exercises from a variety of applications to provide students with the knowledge and experience to develop the ability to perform freehand sketching, lettering, geometric construction, and multi-view projections and to produce various types of drawings (working, detail, assembly, schematic, perspective, and so on).  Computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems (if available) are typically introduced and used to fulfill course objectives.
SMALL GAS ENGINES (285)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Intro to Tech-Energy or Transportation is recommended
Small engine repair is an instructional program that prepares individuals to troubleshoot, service, and repair a variety of small internal-combustion engines, involving both two and four cycle engines used on portable power equipment.  Planned activities will allow students to become knowledgeable of fundamental principles and technical skills related to troubleshooting, repairing, identifying parts and making precision measurements.  Safety will be a key component of this class.  Students will also be exposed to career opportunities related to small engines.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN I (290)
Class Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Prerequisite: Intro to Tech-Energy or Transportation is recommended
This course introduces students to the basic skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks that run on gasoline, electricity, or alternative fuels.  Instructional units include engine performance, automotive electrical system, integrated computer systems, lubrication, exhaust and emission control, steering and suspension, fuel systems, cooling system, braking, and power train.